Stephen M. Schwartz

Appointments and Affiliations

 
 
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Public Health Sciences Division
Epidemiology
Full Member, Appointed: 2002
University of Washington
School of Public Health and Community Medicine
Epidemiology
Professor, Appointed: 2002
University of Washington
School of Medicine
General Internal Medicine
Cardiovascular Health Research Unit
Investigator, Appointed: 1991
Professional Headshot of Stephen M. Schwartz

Mailing Address

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
1100 Fairview Avenue N.
Box 19024
M4-C308
Seattle, Washington 98109-1024
United States

Contact

Phone: (206) 667-4660
Fax: (206) 667-5948
sschwart@fhcrc.org

Degrees

Ph.D., University of Washington, Epidemiology, 1990.
M.P.H., Yale University, Epidemiology, 1984.
B.A., University of Virginia, Biology, 1981.

Research Interests

The following paragraphs provide summaries of my research interests. More details can be found on my webpage, listed above.

Oral Carcinoma

My studies of the molecular epidemiology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) explore the interplay of genetic, virologic, and lifestyle characteristics in both the etiology and prognosis of these cancers. Using data from a population-based case-control study, we have found that the risk of OSCC was related to serologic evidence of both HPV and HSV1 infection, particularly among cigarette smokers. In addition, we found that the detection of HPV DNA in OSCC is related to favorable patient survival. We are currently examining whether OSCC is related to polymorphisms in a variety of genes that are known or suspected of mediating the consequences of tobacco, alcohol, and viral exposures. Examples of genes we have or will study include GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, CYP2E1, NQO1, NAT1, NAT2, EPHX, ADH3, XRCC3, XRCC1, AGT, and XPD. The results should enhance our knowledge of the interaction of environmental and inherited susceptibility to OSCC.

Genital Carcinoma

As part of a Program Project Grant headed by James McDougall, Ph.D., (Cancer Biology Program, FHCRC), I am studying factors related to the prognosis of cervical and other genital cancers. Our goal is to identify tumor markers and other characteristics that in the future may help clinicians predict which patients will develop recurrences and, potentially, target the application of therapies to women at highest risk of relapse. We have found that patients with HPV18-related cervical cancers have reduced survival, and recent immunohistochemical analyses of these tumors suggests that the combination of high cyclin E expression and HPV18 is associated with a particularly poor prognosis.

Uterine Leiomyomata

I have continued my long-standing interest in the etiology of uterine leiomyomata ("fibroids"). Leiomyomata are among the most common neoplasms that develop among women, and although benign, are the leading non-malignant indication for hysterectomy among pre-menopausalwomen. TULEP (The Uterine Leiomyomata Epidemiology Project) is a population-based case-control study we conducted to identify hormonal and hormonally-mediated risk factors for uterine leiomyomata, In addition to an extensive in-person interview focusing on lifestyle, medical, and reproductive characteristics, we collected biologic specimens to determine whether the risk of leiomyomata is related to: (1) urinary excretion of phytoestrogens (lignans, isoflavones); (2) serum organochlorine pesticideand polychlorinated biphenyl residues; and (3) germline polymorphisms in enzymes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism.

Testicular Carcinoma

I am conducting a population-based case-control study to test the hypothesis that inherited variation in genes involved in stimulating testicular steroidogenesis, synthesizing and metabolizing testosterone, and androgen signaling, is related to the risk of developing testicular germ cell carcinoma (TGCC). In addition to examining gene-gene interactions using the case-control data, we are studying whether blood levels of putative endocrine disrupting chemicals, such as p,p-DDE, pose an increased risk of TGCC among carriers of putative TGCC susceptibility alleles (e.g., large numbers of CAG repeats in the Androgen Receptor gene). We also are employing a case-parent triad design (by recruiting the mothers and fathers of our TGCC cases) to test the hypothesis that maternal carriership of susceptibility alleles in steroid metabolism and growth factor genes are related to TGCC risk.

Memberships

American Association for Cancer Research
Society for Epidemiologic Research

Previous Positions

1996-2002, Associate Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Public Health Sciences Division, Epidemiology
1995-1996, Assistant Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Public Health Sciences Division, Epidemiology
1990-1995, Affiliate Investigator, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Public Health Sciences Division, Epidemiology
1990-1996, Assistant Professor, University of Washington, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Epidemiology
1989-1989, Instructor, University of Washington, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Epidemiology
1985-1990, Research Associate, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Epidemiology
1984-1985, Research Associate, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Cancer Surveillance System

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: Homocyst(e)ine, Vitamin Status, and CVD Risk, $262,398, 9/30/95 to 3/30/00.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: Phytoestrogens, Organochlorines, and Fibroid Risk (R01 ES 08305), $384,636, 9/1/96 to 8/31/00.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: Hormonal Risk Factors for Uterine Leiomyomata (R01 HD 29829), $1,115,462, 9/1/95 to 8/31/99.
  • National Institutes of Health/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: Common Variants in Candidate Genes and Premature MI Risk (R01 HL 56931), $2,368,038, 9/15/98 to 8/31/02.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: Oral Cancer: DNA Polymorphisms in Carcinogen Metabolism (R01 DE 12609), $612,483, 8/1/98 to 1/31/02.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute: HPV: Biology, Clinical Significance, and Epidemiology (P01 CA 42792). Sub project- HPV and Prognosis of Female Anogenital Cancer, $518,424, 8/1/95 to 7/31/00.
  • National Institutes of Health/ National Cancer Institute: HPV: Biology, Clinical Significance, and Epidemiology (P01 CA 42792). Sub project- Anogenital Cancer: Epidemiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology., $1,738,809, 8/1/95 to 7/31/00.
  • National Institutes of Health/ National Cancer Institute: Cancer Control in North American Chinese Women (R01 CA 74326), $1,927,761, 6/1/97 to 3/31/01.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute: Cervical Cancer control in a Cambodian Population (R01 CA 70922), $1,903,735, 5/1/96 to 3/31/00.
  • National Institutes of Health/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: Homocyst(e)ine, Vitamin Status, and CVD Risk (R01 HL 54711 Competitive Supplement), $54,740, 12/1/96 to 3/30/98.

Recent Publications

2014
Marks, MA, Chaturvedi AK, Kelsey K, Straif K, Berthiller J, Schwartz SM, Smith E, Wyss A, Brennan P, Olshan AF et al..  2014.  Association of Marijuana Smoking with Oropharyngeal and Oral Tongue Cancers: Pooled Analysis from the INHANCE Consortium.. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology. 23(1):160-71. Abstract
2013
Lohavanichbutr, P, Méndez E, Holsinger CF, Rue TC, Zhang Y, Houck J, Upton MP, Futran N, Schwartz SM, Wang P et al..  2013.  A 13-Gene Signature Prognostic of HPV-Negative OSCC: Discovery and External Validation.. Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. 19(5):1197-203. Abstract
2012
Burnett-Hartman, AN, Newcomb PA, Schwartz SM, Bostick RM, Pawlita M, Waterboer T, Potter JD.  2012.  No association between antibodies to sexually transmitted infections and colorectal hyperplastic polyps in men: Minnesota Cancer Prevention Research Unit Polyp Study.. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology. Abstract
Parsons, HM, Harlan LC, Lynch CF, Hamilton AS, Wu X-C, Kato I, Schwartz SM, Smith AW, Keel G, Keegan THM.  2012.  Impact of cancer on work and education among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 30(19):2393-400. Abstract